Supermarket Solves Canadian Rural Immigration Issue

Imagine running a successful business but having to shut down because there’s no one around to help. Well, that’s what happened with Farmer’s Daughter Country Market in fall 2016. The business attracts student workers, who work during vacations but leave once college starts.

Heather Coulombe, the supermarket’s co-owner, and her sister tried several ideas to employ people, but nothing worked. She put an ad on Service Canada but got applications from immigrants. She tried doing the procedure but it was taking too much time, and she needed employees immediately. So that avenue closed didn’t work for her either. Heather then posted ads on kijiji.ca but didn’t receive any response. There was no choice left for her, and she took the ultimate decision of closing down her supermarket.

Heather comes from a small town in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Whycocomagh only has 400 people living, and Waycobah has 600, to whom the supermarket caters to. Sandee Maclean, Heather’s sister, was out and about hiking on Campbell’s Mountain over the Bras D’Or Lake. Looking at the view and the ample amount of land they owned, Maclean got a fantastic idea.

According to the advertisement

As per the advertisement put up on the supermarket’s Facebook page, selected employees get to live on two acres of the supermarket land. It is wooded, but the employees can build a small house on it for their families. And if they are still working with the supermarket five years later and want to continue working, the land is signed off on their name. A bright idea of plot marketing entirely solves Canada’s rural immigration problems.

Canadian immigrants prefer settling in Ontario or British Columbia, but something like this will encourage them to move to the rural or semi-rural areas. Within the first week of uploading the advertisement, the supermarket received 400 job applications. Today, it is running strong like never before.

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